Biodiversity Preservation

Biodiversity satellite established at Kawamura Memorial DIC Museum of Art

nature trail traversing the site nature trail traversing the site
 
biodiversity satellite "biodiversity satellite"

Located in Sakura, Chiba, the Kawamura Memorial DIC Museum of Art is situated adjacent to the Central Research Laboratories on a lushly forested site featuring a diverse range of naturally growing trees, including cedar, Japanese oak and chinquapin.
With the aim of preserving the site’s rich natural environment, the museum prohibits the collection of plants and wildlife. A nature trail traversing the site allows visitors to enjoy the pristine scenery, which changes from season to season.

In cooperation with the Chiba Biodiversity Center, a prefectural government organization, the Kawamura Memorial DIC Museum of Art recently established a “biodiversity satellite”, special display area with permanent exhibits comprising information panels and other materials related to biodiversity prepared by the organization. The museum’s biodiversity satellite, located in the rest cabin by the small plaza near the end of the nature trail, includes two panels that present rare species native to Chiba and introduce prefecturalbiodiversity preservation initiatives.

The purpose of these satellites is to promote public awareness of biodiversity. To date, the prefecture has established two such satellites, one at the museum and the other at Kamogawa Sea World, an aquarium in the city of Kamogawa.

Protecting nature in Satoyama (border zone between mountain foothills and arable flat land)

The Central Research Laboratories and A Kawamura Memorial DIC Museum of Art The Central Research Laboratories and A Kawamura Memorial DIC Museum of Art

The preservation of biodiversity is a critical issue for the DIC Group and is the subject of various initiatives. 85 top managers from DIC headquarters, DIC plants and group companies attended a lecture given by experts in January, 2011.

While the Central Research Laboratories are currently using ground water, DIC is now working to install a closed system for circulating and reusing water and is working with a waste processing firm to ensure wastewater does not leave the area. The mountainous area is home to 200 species of tree, 500 species of flower, and an abundance of other wildlife including birds and insects. An area where is loved by local communities and society for nature walks, the area has also seen some 200,000 yearly visitors since the opening of the museum in 1990.

VOICE from the DIC Group

Passing to posterity a space where the beauty of art and nature is in harmony

The DIC Group views parks and forests that preserve rich ecologies to be precious assets for local communities and society. Continuing to share with many people the joy of experiencing that beauty and richness requires meticulous management. We feel passing these joys on to future generations are our mission.

Masaaki Iwaki Group Leader General Affairs Group Kawamura Memorial DIC Museum of Art

Masaaki Iwaki
Group Leader
General Affairs Group
Kawamura Memorial DIC Museum of Art

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