Reducing Industrial Waste

Goals and Achievements of Major Initiatives

Objectives of initiatives Goals for fiscal year 2017 Achievements in fiscal year 2017 Evaluation Goals for fiscal year 2018
Reduce industrial waste disposed of
as landfill (“zero emissions”).

Reduce industrial waste generated
by production facilities.
Implement measures at each site with the following goal:
• Reduce industrial waste disposed of as landfill (for sites that have achieved “zero emissions,” maintain that status) (cumulative total of targets for domestic production facilities: 69.9 metric tonnes (-62.0% from fiscal year 2016)).
• Industrial waste disposed of as landfill DIC Group (Japan): 148 metric tonnes(-19.0% from fiscal year 2016)
• Industrial waste generated by production facilities DIC Group (Japan): 32,336 metric tonnes (+3.0% from fiscal year 2016)
Implement measures at each site with the following goal:
• Reduce industrial waste disposed of as landfill (for sites that have achieved “zero emis sions,” maintain that status) (cumulative total of targets for domestic production facilities: 147 metric tonnes (-1% from fiscal year 2017)).
Promote recycling. Promote recycling at DIC Group companies and set a target for resource recycling rate DIC Group (Japan) resource recycling rate: 93.0% (-7.0 percentage points from fiscal year 2016) ★★ Promote recycling at DIC Group companies and set a target for resource recycling rate.
  • Evaluations are based on self-evaluations of current progress. Key: ★★★ = Excellent; ★★ = Satisfactory; ★ = Still needs work

Basic Approach

The DIC Group aims to minimize industrial waste and promote the recycling and reuse of materials. Since fiscal year 2001, DIC has promoted zero emissions initiatives* aimed at reducing industrial waste disposed of as landfill. DIC has deployed zero emissions initiatives at DIC Group companies in Japan since fiscal year 2008. With the aim of expanding efforts across the global DIC Group, in fiscal year 2013 DIC began to introduce management by objectives (MBO) at overseas Group companies. DIC subcontracts the treatment of industrial waste to be disposed of as landfill, and ensures that waste is properly treated by promoting strict compliance and on-site confirmation by designated departments at each of its production facilities.

  • *Zero emissions initiatives: DIC is promoting initiatives aimed at reducing the volume of waste disposed of as landfill by 95% from the fiscal year 2000 level.

Principal Initiatives in Fiscal Year 2017

Reducing Industrial Waste Disposed of as Landfill

The DIC Group works actively to reduce its disposal of industrial waste as landfill by recycling cinders, dust and sludge into, among others, roadbed materials and raw materials for cement, using thermal recycling to recover waste heat and reducing production losses by increasing yields.

Initiatives by the DIC Group in Japan

Industrial Waste Generated in Fiscal Year 2017

Industrial Waste Disposed of as Landfill
Industrial Waste Disposed of as Landfill

In fiscal year 2017, the total volume of industrial waste disposed of as landfill by the DIC Group in Japan amounted to 148 metric tonnes, down 19.0% from fiscal year 2016. This result was attributable primarily to the updating of equipment at production facilities, which led to a one-time decline in the amount of sludge and other waste generated, as well as to efforts to bolster recycling at the Kashima Plant. In fiscal year 2018, all DIC Group companies in Japan will step up the implementation initiatives aimed at achieving zero emissions.
DIC and DIC Group companies in Japan also continued working to ensure the appropriate disposal of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In addition, these companies promoted the strict management of unprocessed waste, including transformers, capacitors and stabilizers, through proper collection and storage in dedicated warehouses.

Deployment of Comprehensive Industrial Waste Management System

Differences Between the e-Manifest System and Paper Manifests

In fiscal year 2016, the DIC Group in Japan explored the introduction and conducted tests of a comprehensive industrial waste management system for use with the country’s Electronic Manifest (e-Manifest) system. The e-Manifest system manages the movement of industrial waste by facilitating the electronic transmission of manifest information and tracking of the flow of waste from generation to final disposal. Unlike paper manifests, the e-Manifest system offers easy data input and eliminates the need for administrative reporting and storage by generators.
With anticipated revisions to Japan’s Waste Management Law expected to increase demand for greater manifest data transparency, DIC resolved to introduce an industrial waste management system that would facilitate the efficient collection of data while also ensuring legal and regulatory compliance. The Group currently uses the system at 13 sites in Japan and intends to gradually expand deployment in the years ahead.

VOICE

Our goal is to ensure that GENESYS–ECO is easy to use for all employees involved in industrial waste management, from beginners to veterans.

GENESYS–ECO is much more than a tool for managing industrial waste. The most important—and most difficult—part of industrial waste management is the issuing of manifests. GENESYS–ECO balances reducing the risk of accidental legal violations with minimizing the burden on the individuals in charge. Linking it to the industry association–administered e-Manifest system will make it possible to automatically generate the annual reports we are required to submit to the authorities, greatly improving work efficiency. Moreover, using information on industrial waste stored in the cloud will enable us to make the entire process—from generation through to final disposal—visible, thereby positioning us to implement initiatives that will reduce our environmental impact. We are confident that this will help us further improve the effectiveness of our industrial waste management and contribute to society. Going forward, our goals are to standardize procedures and ensure that GENESYS–ECO is easy to use for everyone involved in industrial waste management, from beginners to veterans.

Manager, Safety and Environment Group, Saitama Plant Norio Tsunematsu

Manager, Safety and Environment Group, Saitama Plant
Norio Tsunematsu

Initiatives by the DIC Group Overseas

In addition to ensuring the disposal of industrial waste in a manner that complies with national and regional legal and regulatory requirements, the DIC Group’s overseas production facilities work to minimize industrial waste through the voluntary recycling and reuse of materials.
In fiscal year 2017, DIC Group companies in the Americas and Europe, Greater China and the Asia–Pacific region introduced new waste treatment facilities and promoted the horizontal deployment of best practices, including those aimed at improving production processes, with the aim of achieving reductions in industrial waste generated that exceeded nationally and regionally mandated levels. Nonetheless, the total volume of industrial waste generated by DIC Group production facilities overseas rose 5.7%. Looking ahead, regional headquarters in these areas will focus on further reinforcing compliance with local laws and regulations while at the same time cooperating with DIC’s Responsible Care and Production Management departments to analyze the reasons for this increase with the aim of curbing the generation of industrial waste and reducing the volume of industrial waste disposed of as landfill.

TOPICS 

New system for thermally decomposing and deodorizing VOCs
New system for thermally decomposing and deodorizing VOCs

Newly Installed Thermal Combustion System at DIC Graphics (Guangzhou) Facilitates the Efficient Treatment of VOCs

In August 2017, DIC Graphics (Guangzhou) installed a new system for thermally decomposing and deodorizing VOCs in exhaust gas from production processes. The new system fills the combustion chamber with a ceramic material that absorbs heat, making it possible to spontaneously combust VOC gas streams and at a high temperature using only a small amount of auxiliary fuel. In the past, activated carbon adsorption was used to destroy VOCs. Because it facilitates the efficient thermal decomposition and deodorization of medium- and low-density VOCs, the system has contributed to a significant reduction in energy consumption and maintenance requirements.

Renovated wastewater treatment system
Renovated wastewater treatment system

DIC (Malaysia) Reduces Environmental Impact by Renovating its Wastewater Treatment System

With the instability of treatment using its existing wastewater treatment system an issue from an environmental compliance perspective, printing inks manufacturer DIC (Malaysia) suspended operation of the system, opting instead to dispose of all wastewater from production processes externally as waste. In fiscal year 2017, DIC’s Production Management Department worked with the company to develop a stable wastewater treatment process and made necessary renovations to its treatment system, obtaining approval and the appropriate license from Malaysia’s Department of Environment. The improved system, which resumed full-scale operation in December 2017, has enabled the company to ensure that its treated wastewater meets local standards, as well as to reduce its total waste disposal volume.

Separate discharge routes for plant wastewater and rainwater
Separate discharge routes for plant wastewater and rainwater

DIC’s Komaki Plant Separates Plant Wastewater and Rainwater Discharge Routes in Line with ESH Audit Suggestion

The Komaki Plant, which produces PPS compounds, among others, uses an on-site treatment system to purify wastewater from production processes, which it then releases into a channel that flows into the nearby Oyama River. The system is also used to remove oil and particulates from rainwater collected from plant road surfaces, which is then discharged into the river. However, with this configuration there is a risk that a leak or other issue within the plant could result in the two types of water being mixed together and released into the river. In fiscal year 2016, this issue was raised with the plant during an ESH audit. The plant immediately implemented remedial measures, completely separating the discharge routes for wastewater from production processes and rainwater discharge routes, with the aim of reducing risk.

Environmental Impact of the DIC Group’s Operating Activities

The DIC Group quantifies the environmental inputs (consumption of energy and other resources) and outputs (emissions into the environment) of its operating activities, and uses its findings to formulate comprehensive and efficient strategies for reducing its environmental footprint.
T he chart below is a comprehensive illustration of the environmental impact of the DIC Group’s domestic operating activities in fiscal year 2017. The chart shows environmental impact for two input items (total energy consumption and total water consumption) and six output items (emissions of 551 chemical substances (including those designated under the PRTR*1) and one substance group*2, emissions of CO2, emissions of NOx, emissions of SOx, COD in wastewater and industrial waste disposed of as landfill.)

Environmental Impact of the DIC Group’s Operating Activities

  • *1The PRTR is a scheme in Japan for assessing, aggregating and disseminating data on the sources of hazardous chemicals, amounts released into the environment and amounts transferred off-site from industrial establishments via waste products.
  • *2The “551 substances and one substance group” comprises 462 chemical substances designated by the PRTR and 89 substances and one substance group targeted for study by the JCIA.

TOPICS DIC India Celebrates World Environment Week

World Environment Week at DIC India
World Environment Week at DIC India

The DIC Group promotes diverse ESH initiatives in countries and territories around the world. In June 2016, DIC India Ltd. celebrated World Environment Week, a campaign aimed at reinforcing the company’s commitment to ongoing environmental protection. Individual days during the week were assigned specific themes and named accordingly—for example, Water Conservation Day, Energy Conservation Day and Waste Minimization Day—and a variety of programs were offered, including theme-specific employee awareness training. DIC applauds these and other voluntary initiatives that enhance employees’ understanding of environmental and safety issues and recognizes the importance of such efforts in helping to realize a sustainable society.

TOPICS Reducing Industrial Waste: Efforts to Promote Recycling at DIC EP’s Sodegaura Plant

Manager, Sodegaura Plant, DIC EP Corp. Hiroshi Tanaka
Manager, Sodegaura Plant,
DIC EP Corp.
Hiroshi Tanaka

At the Sodegaura Plant we produce polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) polymer, an engineering plastic. PPS polymer is a thermoplastic resin with excellent heat and chemical resistance that has a wide range of applications, from electronic components and residential hot water heater parts to parts for automobile interiors, for which they are fortified with glass fibers or another material and used as compounds. An alternative to metal, PPS polymer is light and suitable for high-volume production, making them extremely useful in reducing energy use (by improving fuel efficiency).
There are two main kinds of industrial waste produced at the Sodegaura Plant. The first is sludge, a low-molecular-weight material (polymerization residue, reaction solvent, etc.) that is a byproduct of polymerization reactions. The second is waste alkali (the product of allowing unreacted sodium sulfide to be absorbed in a caustic soda solution). Full-scale efforts to reduce industrial waste began in fiscal year 2002. Since fiscal year 2008, we have worked to improve our recycling efforts. Consequently, in fiscal year 2010 we succeeded in reducing energy usage per unit of production for low-molecular-weight materials and waste alkali by 70% and 50%, respectively, from fiscal year 2002. This was accomplished by repeatedly outsourcing recycling operations to interim waste treatment companies and by processing more hard-to-treat industrial waste. Our efforts in promoting recycling by organizations reusing these materials also paid off in fiscal year 2010. Going forward, we will continue to promote recycling as well as to examine ways in which waste alkali could be put to use as sodium hydrosulfide.

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